KS1 SATsTowards the end of Key Stage 1, Year 2 children take the KS1 SATs. (Statutory Assessment Tests). The children are assessed between the beginning of January and 4 weeks before the end of the summer term. Tasks and Tests may be administered at any time during the assessment period. Reported results will reflect children’s everyday achievements and not just results obtained in a ‘one-off’ test.

English

Speaking and Listening:
There is no formal test for this aspect of the English curriculum and it is measured by teacher assessments throughout the year. A Level 1, 2 or 3 grade will be given.

Reading:
It is unusual for a child to take more than one test.
The overall grades a child is given will be usually be 1, 2C, 2B, 2A, or 3.
Your child will either have:
An optional reading task
This will award levels 1 or 2. The task assesses the child’s ability to read a book aloud with accuracy, fluency and discuss his or her understanding of the text. Teachers will be required to use a book with which the child is not familiar.
A reading test for level 2
It will consist of a story and one or more other texts with questions for children to answer on each page of a single booklet. The test will award level 2 and provide grades 2C, 2B or 2A. The test assesses the child’s ability to read independently and respond in writing to comprehension questions.
OR
A reading test for level 3
This will be based on a story booklet and a separate information text, together with one question booklet for children to complete. Using previous teacher assessments the teacher assesses if this test is appropriate for the individual child.

Writing
The overall grades a child is given will be usually be 1, 2C, 2B, 2A, or 3.
Your child will have all of the below:
Two writing tasks
These will cover levels 1 to 3 and will provide grades 1, 2C, 2B, 2A or 3. The task assesses the child’s ability to communicate meaning in writing, to use punctuation and spelling accurately and write legibly. There will be one longer task of approximately 45 minutes and shorter task of approximately 30 minutes.
A spelling test
This is for levels 1-3 and should be administered with the rest of the tests. This will not provide a separate levelled result for spelling, but will contribute towards the child’s level in writing.

 

Mathematics

It is unusual for a child to take more than one test.
The overall grades a child is given will be usually be 1, 2C, 2B, 2A, or 3.
Your child will either have:
An optional task for mathematics
This can be used with children judged to be working towards or within level 1 in mathematics as a whole.
A mathematics test for level 2
It will consist of mental arithmetic questions and written questions. Children can have the questions read out to them and even complete the tasks in small groups. They are given some apparatus (mirrors, rulers etc) to use to help them answer the questions. The test will award level 2 and provide grades 2C, 2B or 2A.
OR
A mathematics test for level 3
This is similar to the level 2 test but the content will be more challenging. Using previous teacher assessments the teacher decides if this test is appropriate for the individual child. Generally, children deemed to be working in level 3 or 2A will take the level 3 test.

 

Science

There is no formal test for this curriculum area and it is measured by teacher assessments throughout the year. A Level 1, 2 or 3 grade will be given.

 

How can I help my child?

Continue to do the things you are already doing!

  • Encourage your child to do the homework that is set
  • Encourage your child to read each day
  • Find opportunities for your child to use numbers in everyday situations (telling the time, using money etc) and encourage them to work out sums in their head
  • Attend each of the three annual parent workshops
  • Encourage your child to follow up interests and talk to them about it
  • Talk to your child about what they are learning at school
  • Continue with the normal daily routine – as you know, a good night’s sleep and a good breakfast helps them learn
  • Don’t place pressure on the children – we believe they work better if they don’t even realise that the SATs are taking place!

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is teacher assessment?
When children are 7, 11 and 14, teachers make formal National Curriculum assessments of their work in some subjects. This is called teacher assessment.
Of course, teachers also assess children’s work informally almost every time they teach a class. For example, they mark sums, listen to children reading, or watch how they do scientific experiments. Knowing how children are doing in class helps teachers plan what the children should learn next.

Why are there tests as well as teacher assessment?
Tests and teacher assessment measure your child’s achievement in different ways.
Tests measure what all children can do when they are set the same questions. They also help teachers identify strengths and weaknesses in children’s understanding.
Teacher assessment judges your child’s performance across the whole subject over time.
At the end of Key Stage One the tests help inform and justify the teacher assessments alongside other evidence, such as the understanding shown by pupils in their classwork. Only teacher assessments are reported at the end of Year Two.

Are the tests stressful for children?
The tests can be given to children at any time during the year and they shouldn’t be particularly aware of what they’re used for or their significance – we try to keep things very low key. The tests only cover what children have been learning at school. Everybody involved in the tests takes great care to make sure that they are not stressful and are as fair as possible to all children.

Do we talk to the children about it?
The children are aware of the ‘activity booklets’ but we don’t emphasise that they are SATs or that they should be worried. We say to the children that they should see them as a chance to show off what they have learnt so far this year. It is important that they don’t worry about it or are placed under any stress.

What support will my child get?
This varies according to the individual child’s needs. In level 1 tasks, the children will work in small groups or as individuals completing reading and maths activities. During the level 2 and 3 maths tasks the children can have every question read out to them and often the tasks are implemented in small groups with the teacher reading out each question. In level 2 and 3 literacy tasks, no reading support is given to allow the children to produce independent work but encouragement throughout.

When will they take place?
During the months of May or June.

How long do the SATs papers take?
None of the tests have a time limit but if a child is taking a long time to complete it then the teacher uses their judgement when to stop their test. Quite often however, the children will have a break halfway through the test to get some exercise and fresh air!

What do National Curriculum levels mean?
At the end of the year you will get a report with a level for reading, writing, speaking and listening, mathematics and science. The grades usually given for reading, writing and maths are Level 1 – Level 2C – Level 2B – Level 2A – Level 3. For the other subjects, a Level 1, 2 or 3 is given. The target standard is a 2B. A 2A is above expectations and a level 3 means your child is doing even better. Remember that for some children, a level 1 in year 2 might still be a fantastic achievement.

What are the SATs used for?
Results are passed up to the year 3 teachers but when they begin in September most teachers will carry out their own, fresh assessments (partly because children’s levels can go up or down over the summer holidays). The end of Year 2 levels are however used to create your child’s targets to reach in year 6. These will normally be at least two full levels higher than their year 2 scores. So, if they achieved level 2b at year 2, they would be expected to attain a level 4b or more by the end of Year 6. This is subject to change as the new National Curriculum will be used across the school from September 2015.